Douglas Vale volunteers look ahead to December 2017 fundraiser

Helping out: Volunteer Gerry Nagle adds lift wires to a grape vine trellis at Douglas Vale.
Helping out: Volunteer Gerry Nagle adds lift wires to a grape vine trellis at Douglas Vale.

Douglas Vale volunteers are looking forward to a fundraiser in December after rain forced the cancellation of an open day and garage sale trail event.

Wet ground, coupled with a predicted rain squall, meant organisers had to call-off the October 21 fundraiser at Douglas Vale Historic Homestead and Vineyard.

Douglas Vale Conservation Group president Brian Buckett said it was a hard decision to cancel the fundraiser as the volunteers had put in so much effort and dedication.

Healthy garden: Volunteers Karlene Melville, Jan Schoesmith, David Horn and Pat Foy tend the vegetable garden.

Healthy garden: Volunteers Karlene Melville, Jan Schoesmith, David Horn and Pat Foy tend the vegetable garden.

But they are already looking ahead to the next fundraiser.

Mr Buckett said a garage sale day and sausage sizzle/Devonshire tea would go ahead in December at a date to be set.

Money raised goes back into Douglas Vale.

Mr Buckett said the fundraisers were extremely important.

“Being a volunteer not-for-profit organisation, we have to make every opportunity count in terms of being able to obtain the necessary funds to maintain the property, and keep conserving the property and preserving it for the future,” he said.

The volunteers are also gearing up for a couple of major projects.

Volunteer contribution: Wayne Cooper and Christine Brown enjoy the tranquil setting at Douglas Vale Historic Homestead and Vineyard.

Volunteer contribution: Wayne Cooper and Christine Brown enjoy the tranquil setting at Douglas Vale Historic Homestead and Vineyard.

“We’ve got to look to a bright future,” Mr Buckett said.

“Douglas Vale is going to be here well into the future.”

Douglas Vale is Port Macquarie’s oldest vineyard and timber homestead.

The community-driven tourist attraction interprets the last remaining fabric of a successful wine industry of the 1800s.