MacKillop College students to help Zonta Port Macquarie assemble birthing kits

Helping: MacKillop College assistant principal, Jennifer Campbell, with year 9 MacKillop students, Reece Fretten, Samuel Cramer, Mirren Campbell, Jorja Montgomery and Marie Tessede. Photo: supplied
Helping: MacKillop College assistant principal, Jennifer Campbell, with year 9 MacKillop students, Reece Fretten, Samuel Cramer, Mirren Campbell, Jorja Montgomery and Marie Tessede. Photo: supplied

MacKillop College students have joined forces with Zonta Port Macquarie to assemble 1000 birthing kits.

Once completed, the kits are sent to developing countries around the world.

Zonta spokesperson Margaret Bateman said the birthing kit idea - and the foundation formed to operate it - was established in South Australian in 2006.

"The foundation ensures kits are available for use by women in rural and remote areas in countries with the highest rate or number of maternal and neonatal deaths such as Afghanistan, Nigeria, Kenya, DR Congo, Chad, Uganda, Ethiopia and Papua New Guinea," Mrs Bateman said.

"The 2018 birthing kit assembly project is being completed in association with year 9 students from MacKillop.

"There are several sponsors for the project including a grant from Charles Sturt University and along with sponsors, KFC Port Macquarie, Port Macquarie Private Hospital and Five-Star Medical Centre.

“We have commenced the project, stage 1 being preparation of the soap. The actual assembly day will be Saturday October 27 and we are grateful for the assistance and cooperation of MacKillop College."

The Birthing Kit Foundation of Australia works with organisations and communities in developing countries - specifically East Africa and South Asia - to provide a clean birth environment to lessen the risk of infection, the greatest cause of infant and maternal mortality.

The kits contain a one metre square plastic sheet, a piece of soap, two pairs of gloves, string, scalpel blades and sterile blades, gauze squares.

“We are looking forward to delivering 1000 assembled birthing kits, and potentially saving the lives of mothers and babies,” Mrs Bateman said.

The cost of 1000 kits is $3000.

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