Mid North Coast SLSA awards up 300 per cent on last year -1966

Kevin Ruscoe and “Rick” Wright of SWR Surf Club with the trophy given by W.H. Marshall & Son and Coca-Cola, in memory of Pat Hetherington and Geoff McClelland.

Kevin Ruscoe and “Rick” Wright of SWR Surf Club with the trophy given by W.H. Marshall & Son and Coca-Cola, in memory of Pat Hetherington and Geoff McClelland.

Awards gained in the Mid-North Coast Branch of the S.L.S.A. rose 300 per cent in 1966-67, compared with the previous year. The 92 awards included 62 bronze medallions, 13 instructor certificates and 17 qualifying certificates.

Membership rose to 574 including 168 active members. At last Saturday night’s annual branch dinner, the deputy president of state centre, Mr Ern Lawler, said this was one of the few branches which saw an increase in both membership and awards this season.

Surf rescues have increased by 200 to 4,256, 80 of which required mouth to mouth resuscitation, and awards have increased by 92 to 2,054. “Equipment actually used for life-saving such as surf boats and reels were valued at $391,307 this year,” Mr Lawler said.

Mr. Lawler presented branch honour pennants to the following members who have given outstanding service to their respective clubs: John Dingle (Port Macquarie), Peter Brenton (Kempsey-Crescent Head), Bruce Swalwell (South West Rocks), Raymond Gill (Camden Haven) and George Fowler (Wauchope-Bonny Hills). Mr. Mal. Caldwell, branch registrar, presented the J.H. Brown Shield to Port Macquarie club president Dick Hehir. The club won the shield for its superiority in water events, especially among the juniors.

Mr. Hehir paid tribute to Mr. Bill Gilleland, who so successfully trained the juniors this season. The other awards went to South West Rocks club. The M. and P. Waters shield was presented by co-donor Max Waters to Ron Thiele. The Coca-Cola reel donated by the Marshall Brothers was presented by branch president Max Sabien to S.W.R. club captain Ricky Wright.

Nothing to lose but dirty water

Letter to the Editor – Sir, The old saying: ‘He who pays the piper calls the time’, has apparently never come to the notice of our local council. We, he ratepayers, supply the money and the council does not even have the courtesy to consult us on how that money should be used.

Surely, in considering the greatest good of the greatest number of residents, a filtration plant should take precedence over fluoridation, which will only affect a. minority of the population … The council would surely find it much cheaper to make a free issue of these tablets to all children, than to install a plant to treat all the water regardless, and the tablets would ensure a safe dosage …

Apart from the risks to health, it is most unpleasant to bathe and wash clothes in the filthy liquid that comes through the taps every time there is fairly heavy rain, and that is frequent here. If the milkman were to supply us with impure milk, he would soon be called to account by the law, but our council continues to supply us with dubious water and we have to pay for it without question.

I suggest that the rate-payers should send a questionnaire to all our aldermen, asking them what their stand is on this question (and also on the inadequate drainage system as well!), then we will know how to vote at the next council elections. Let our slogan be — “Ratepayers of Port Macquarie, unite — we have nothing to lose but dirty water!” Yours faithfully, New Resident.

Deputy president of state SLSA Ern Lawler presents a branch Honour Pennant to John Dingle of Port Macquarie. Mr. Dingle was awarded for service to Nippers lifesaving.

Deputy president of state SLSA Ern Lawler presents a branch Honour Pennant to John Dingle of Port Macquarie. Mr. Dingle was awarded for service to Nippers lifesaving.