Port Macquarie's premier citizens attend glamorous nuptials

Bride and groom: Sonya and Eric Hackett, on their wedding day, June 10, 1967, after a ceremony at St Agnes' Catholic Church Port Macquarie.

Bride and groom: Sonya and Eric Hackett, on their wedding day, June 10, 1967, after a ceremony at St Agnes' Catholic Church Port Macquarie.

Hackett–Huxley Wedding

Mr Eric Hackett married Miss Sonya Huxley at the Roman Catholic Church of St Agnes last Saturday afternoon. Sonya was a most beautiful bride and the wedding, which attracted a good deal of local attention, was acclaimed one of the prettiest seen for some time.

Junior bridesmaid Helen Huxley stole the show (almost), from the bride as she led the four bridesmaids – Maureen Fitzpatrick, Leseley Roohan, Kay Andrews and June McPherson into the church.

Father Clem Dick, a native of Port Macquarie, performed the marriage ceremony. In the church and at the glamorous reception which followed at the surf pavilion, the Hackett family was well represented. The parents, Mr and Mrs Pat Hackett, are city residents; Mr Pat Hackett junior, was best man, and the groomsmen were three Johnnies – John Sawyer, John Huxley and John Barton.

On the bride’s side some of the well-known district families were represented among the guests –  the Andrews, Grahams, Peads and Suters.

Shire president Mr Joe Andrews was in glorious voice for the occasion and his singing of The Wedding at the reception was an absolutely wonderful treat. In the church, Mr Andrews sang O Perfect Love. His sister, Mrs C.J. Burdekin, and Mr Charles Huxley’s sister, Mrs Gwen Burke, also sang, and Miss Leseley Roohan recited The White Magnolia Tree. Sonya’s husband is employed by the Rural Bank.

Taxi Drivers’ Petition

A petition from the taxi drivers will come before tonight’s council meeting to abolish the central taxi rank in Horton Street. The drivers presented their petition to the town clerk on Friday morning. The proposal is that four taxis stand in line alongside the footpath, from the Ritz Theatre to Ken Wilson’s Chemist store. Persons wanting a taxi off the rank must go to the first one in the line. The other taxis will stand in Hay Street near the municipal library, and will be called by radio when a taxi pulls out of the rank. The drivers claim that this is the only town in New South Wales that has not adopted the “first in line” rule.

First in line: Taxi drivers want a first in line policy instead of taxi stand. Wilson’s Chemist on Horton Street, is where the line is proposed to start.

First in line: Taxi drivers want a first in line policy instead of taxi stand. Wilson’s Chemist on Horton Street, is where the line is proposed to start.

VIEW Club for Port Macquarie

Voice, interests, and education of women, gives rise to the VIEW Club about to be established in Port Macquarie. Later this month, the assistant state secretary from VIEW Club headquarters, Miss Margaret Bell, will be visiting Port Macquarie, meeting prospective members and making arrangements for the club’s formation meeting. For many years VIEW clubs have received requests from women in all parts of New South Wales to establish clubs in their areas. The different and important aspect about VIEW clubs is that they are designed for women themselves. VIEW clubs cater for the homemakers’ interests and help solve, through mutual exchange of ideas, problems which arise each day. VIEW clubs are so named as through them the views of the homemaker can be voiced. Time off for the busy housewife is most important. It is essential to her wellbeing to make time to do the things she really enjoys, such as meeting new people and cultivating fresh interests. This she can do through her VIEW club.

Horton Street circa 1960s

Horton Street circa 1960s