Holiday road toll hits 16 with death of motorcyclist

The NSW holiday road toll has reached 16, following the death of a motorcyclist in the Hunter yesterday.

About 5.15pm, a motorcycle and four-wheel-drive collided on the Putty Road at Howes Valley, approximately 50km south of Singleton.As a result the male motorcyclist, aged in his sixties, died at the scene. He was the sixteenth person to be killed on NSW roads since the launch of ‘Operation Safe Arrival’, the NSW Police Force’s annual Christmas/New Year traffic enforcement.

Operation Safe Arrival will conclude at 11.59pm today (Friday 4 January), however Superintendent Bob Ryan from the NSW Police Force’s Traffic and Highway Patrol Command said motorists can expect to see an ongoing and highly visible police presence on the roads in the weeks ahead.

“For the remainder of the summer, we will continue to conduct numerous road safety operations, designed to catch dangerous drivers before they hurt or kill themselves or someone else,” Superintendent Ryan said.

“Last January (2012), 32 people were killed on NSW roads.

“With thousands of families heading off to holiday locations throughout the state, major roads, highways and freeways will be busy, meaning police will be busy too.

“We’ve said it before and we will say it again – this time of year should be spent with friends and family, not in the back of an ambulance, an intensive care ward, a police cell or morgue.

“If you are taking to the roads over the coming weeks, do the right thing by yourself, your family, your friends and other road users –stick to the road rules, drive to the conditions and arrive at your destination safe and sound.”

On Day 14 of Operation Safe Arrival, police conducted 24,700 breath tests, resulting in nine motorists being charged for drink driving.

Officers also caught 702 speeding motorists and booked a further 846 road-users for other traffic offences.

Superintendent Ryan said it was clear that far too many motorists don’t appreciate the risks associated with breaking the road rules.

“If you are foolish enough to speed, drink drive, run a red light or use a handheld phone while in control of a vehicle, getting caught by police is a lucky break!

“The reality is the consequences of your behaviour could be far worse – you could kill a loved one, you could kill yourself, you could lose your ability to walk, or you could end up spending a number of guilt-ridden years behind bars,” Superintendent Ryan said.

Some examples of irresponsible driving behaviour on Day 14 of Operation Safe Arrival

Some examples of irresponsible driving behaviour on Day 14 of Operation Safe Arrival

Some examples of irresponsible driving behaviour on Day 14 of Operation Safe Arrival

Some examples of irresponsible driving behaviour on Day 14 of Operation Safe Arrival

Some examples of irresponsible driving behaviour on Day 14 of Operation Safe Arrival

Some examples of irresponsible driving behaviour on Day 14 of Operation Safe Arrival

About 7.10pm, a 41-year-old woman was arrested and charged with a number of offences after leading police on a high-speed pursuit through the streets of Deniliquin with an unrestrained five-year-old child seated in the rear of the Subaru Impreza she was driving.

A 22-year-old P1 licence holder, stopped for an RBT on the Princes Highway in West Wollongong about 12.20am, was charged with mid-range drink driving after she returned a breath analysis reading of 0.143.

An 18-year-old P1 licence holder from Arncliffe, was fined $2,154 and had his licence suspended after being caught travelling at 146km/h – 56km/h over the 90km/h speed limit for P1 drivers – on the Hume Highway in Goulburn shortly before 11am.

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