Will the shoulder charge remain in Group 3's repertoire? 

GROUP 3 Rugby League's rule on the crowd favourite shoulder charge tackle could go the same way as the National Rugby League.

The NRL has banned the move ahead of the 2013 competition and Country Rugby League will convene in February to decide if it will follow the same track.

Group 3 secretary Barrie Smith said the group had no say in the decision.

Although the result is out of the control of the group, Mr Smith said he would be surprised if the tackle was banned.

"I personally can't see it being banned," he said.

"Refs have the option of penalising on a malicious tackle that's not within the true spirit of the game already.

"The blokes in Sydney are a lot quicker, fitter and much bigger so when they do a shoulder charge it can cause a lot more damage.

"We really don't have that big of a problem with it in our competition."

While the controversial tackling style has its supporters, president of Hastings League Geoff Connor said it was banned from his competition a few years ago.

"Hastings League is unique in the way that you can have such a different mix of skill levels and experience of players," he said.

"You can have young up and coming players up against guys who have played 300 games.

"Or you can get guys who are in their 20s that want to have a run for the first time ever so that's why we decided to outlaw it a few years back.

"It's all to do with the duty of care to our players and I think it helped with recruitment and I think parents of the kids are happy it's not allowed."

The captains of our respective first grade Group 3 teams have a different opinion.

Michael Bright from the Port Macquarie Sharks said he didn't want it taken from the game.

"No way. If you think you're good enough to pull one off, then go for it," he said.

"It's a low-percentage play, so if you want to risk someone running straight past you and making you look like an idiot, that's up to you.

"But anything that makes contact with the head should be dealt with."

Port City Breakers captain-coach Josh Hyde said he would be disappointed if the shoulder charge was banned.

"We go out there knowing the dangers involved in the sport," he said.

"I don't want it to turn into soccer, where players go out there to take dives."

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